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THE BASICS ABOUT DISTORTION IN MICS

We do not want any unintended distortion in our recording chain. Unfortunately, there is usually some form of distortion present although it is below the threshold of audibility.

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APPLICATION GUIDE

HOW TO MOUNT THE d:vote™ INSTRUMENT MICROPHONE ON VARIOUS INSTRUMENTS

A visual guide to mounting the d:vote™ Instrument Microphone on various instruments.

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APPLICATION GUIDE

HOW TO MIC HI-HAT & CYMBALS

Usually, a lot of bleed from the rest of the drum kit is also picked up at the hi-hat position so microphone choice and placement is crucial.

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APPLICATION GUIDE

HOW TO MIC TOM-TOMS

The tom-toms can be miked in the same way as the snare, but toms can have different roles in different music styles and some considerations and genre aesthetics are appropriate.

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APPLICATION GUIDE

HOW TO MIC THE STEEL PANS

Steel drums or steel pans are instruments with a very wide tonal range from bass to soprano, and a tonal quality with lots of complex harmonics. This is all best captured from a little distance with a good central stereo pair.

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APPLICATION GUIDE

HOW TO MIC AN OBOE

Close- or spot-miking an oboe is very similar to that of the soprano saxophone, bassoon and clarinet: Aim the mic at the fingering holes, 1/3 of the length up from the bell, at a distance of 15-20 cm.

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APPLICATION GUIDE

HOW TO MIC A HARP

The harp, like the grand piano, is a challenging instrument to record. Its sound field is complex and can only truthfully be picked up if you are at least 2 to 3 meters away from the instrument.

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APPLICATION GUIDE

HOW TO MIC THE GU ZHENG (CHINESE LAP HARP)

One overhead microphone is able to pick up the impressive timbre and dynamics of the chinese harp. Using a pair of overheads tends to reproduce the instrument with too wide an image.

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APPLICATION GUIDE

HOW TO MIC A GRAND PIANO

A concert grand piano is among the largest and most versatile acoustical instruments in the world. Capturing the natural timbre and the full dynamics of an instrument of these proportions requires both skill and quality recording equipment.

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APPLICATION GUIDE

HOW TO MIC JAZZ DRUMS

Miking the jazz drum kit is a truly creative opportunity says Gary Baldassari, an American recording engineer.
The Jazz drum kit is very different to the rock kit. Many Classic Jazz producers will not allow close up miking of the kick drum.

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APPLICATION GUIDE

HOW TO MIC A DRUM KIT

How close do you place a snare drum mic above the skin? Have you ever heard the sound of the drum that close? Hopefully not! Nevertheless, that is where we normally place the snare mic.

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APPLICATION GUIDE

HOW TO MIC A CLARINET

Close- or spot-miking a clarinet is very similar to that of the soprano saxophone, bassoon and oboe: Aim the mic at the fingering holes, a third of the length up from the bell, at a distance of 15-20 cm.

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APPLICATION GUIDE

HOW TO MIC A CHOIR

Amplifying choirs for PA and live applications can be a major challenge. In many cases, the choir is performing against an orchestra with a high stage level. At the same time, stage monitors may be loud, making voice clarity difficult to achieve.

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